Picture
I think it is a reflection on our times that a rap video posted on YouTube has invoked more awareness and debate about modern economic theory among the masses compared to countless serious debate forums and books.

Boiling it down to the basics, Keynesian economics calls for intervention by the government and the use of government spending and money market operations as a tool for controlling the direction of the economy.  In the process, it allows for inflation as an acceptable cost for the greater purpose of economic growth and prosperity.

Hayek on the other hand takes a stand against inflation, and the so called printing of money by the government.  He argued that stimulus was a short term temperature control and not a permanent cure for the economy.  Today he stands as a symbol for those arguing against the increase in public debt as a fix to the economic woes of the world at large.

I am not going to get into a lengthy debate over this subject as there are some really good resources already available that I don’t think I can add much value to.  My purpose is to bring you the YouTube clip that has taken this debate from government and political circles and brought it to the general public.  Enjoy!  

4/11/2013 08:26:05 pm

The post is obviously fantastically investigated and also structured, along with becoming consisting in sensible words. Than

Reply
Zara
4/12/2013 01:14:11 pm

Thank you for your comment - it is much appreciated

Reply



Leave a Reply.

    Disclaimer: MoneyCoach and the managers of the site Investment Opinion.net take no responsibility for the actions of any visitors to this site.  All information on this site is representative of the perspective of the contributing authors and may not reflect facts. All visitors are cautioned to obtain qualified financial advice from licensed individuals.

    Categories

    All
    Broke
    Credit
    Debit Cards
    Debt
    Economy
    Estate Planning
    Etf
    Europe
    Investments
    Mutual Funds
    On Line Trading
    Opg
    Politics
    Recession
    Relationships
    Retirement
    Spending
    Tsx